My Blog
By Your Family Dentist, PC
August 12, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   bad breath  
4SimpleThingsYouCanDotoStopBadBreath

When they weren't building pyramids or wrapping mummies, the ancient Egyptians mixed herbs and spices with a little honey to make small lozenges. Their purpose: to fight halitosis, that perennial scourge of polite society. More specifically, they were the first known breath mints.

Just like our ancient forebears, we're still trying to stop bad breath—to the tune of $12 billion annually for breath-freshening products. For the most part, though, fresher breath is still largely the byproduct of dedicated oral care. In recognition of National Fresh Breath Day this August 6th, here are 4 simple things you can do to help eliminate embarrassing bad breath.

Remove dental plaque. Mouth bacteria proliferating within a thin buildup of food particles is called dental plaque—the main culprit in 85—90% of bad breath cases. These bacteria can emit volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), which have a characteristic rotten egg smell. You can reduce bacteria and their foul odors by removing plaque with daily brushing and flossing and twice-a-year dental cleanings.

Boost your saliva. An inadequate flow of saliva, often a side effect of certain medications, can leave your mouth dry and susceptible to bacterial growth and subsequent bad breath. You can increase saliva flow by drinking more water, using saliva-boosting aids, or speaking with your doctor about alternative medications with less of a dry mouth side effect.

Brush your tongue. Some people find their tongue is “Velcro” for tiny food particles, which attract bacteria. It's always a good idea to brush your tongue (especially toward the back) to loosen and remove any clinging food particles. If it continues to be a problem, you can also employ a tongue scraper for a more thorough tongue cleaning.

Get a checkup. Although bacterial growth from inadequate hygiene is the usual cause for bad breath, it isn't the only one. Dental diseases like tooth decay or gum disease can also create unpleasant mouth odors, as well as serious conditions like diabetes, kidney infections or certain cancers. If your bad breath persists despite diligent hygiene, see us or your doctor for a more comprehensive exam.

During our long war with halitosis, we've learned a thing or two about its causes. We've also learned that practicing good oral habits is the best thing you can do to beat bad breath.

If you would like more information about controlling bad breath, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bad Breath: More Than Just Embarrassing.”

By Your Family Dentist, PC
August 02, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: toothache  
YourToothacheMightSignalaProblemOtherThaninYourMouth

You expect a decayed tooth, a fracture or a gum infection to be the cause for that toothache causing you grief. Sometimes, though, the answer may be “none of the above”—there's nothing wrong going on in your mouth to cause the pain.

You pain is real—but its source is elsewhere in the body, a situation known as referred pain. It's important to find out the pain's true source to determine what kind of treatment you'll need to alleviate it.

Here are some of the likely candidates for a “toothache” that's not a toothache.

Facial nerves. Tooth pain may be associated with trigeminal neuralgia, a misfiring disorder of the trigeminal nerves that course through either side of the face. The nerve is divided into three branches, two of which are located in the upper face and one in the lower jaw. Because they're interconnected, a problem with one of the branches in other parts of the face could be felt in the branch around the jaw.

Jaw joints. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMD) can cause pain in the pair of joints that connect the lower jaw to the skull. The joints can become inflamed due to stress or trauma and the associated muscles begin spasming, causing severe pain. Because of their proximity to the teeth, the pain from the joints can radiate into the dental area and mimic a toothache.

Ear or sinus infections. Both the ears and the maxillary sinus are subject to infections that can cause severe pain and pressure. With the close proximity of both the ears and the sinus to the upper jaw, it's quite possible for pain originating in these structures to be felt within the mouth.

These are only a few of the possibilities that also include migraines, shingles, fibromyalgia and even vitamin deficiencies. As such, your dentist or physician may need to do a little detective work to locate the true cause. But the effort to locate where your mouth pain is actually coming from will help ensure you get the right treatment to give you lasting relief.

If you would like more information on referred tooth pain, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Referred Pain: When a Toothache Is Not Really a Toothache.”

By Your Family Dentist, PC
July 23, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   nutrition  
EnjoyYourIceCream-ButJustaLittleforYourDentalHealthsSake

If you love ice cream, then you'll get a kick out of this: Your favorite treat has its own month. That's right, July is National Ice Cream Month, when we celebrate—and indulge in—one of the most delicious concoctions ever known. Just don't overdo it, among other reasons, for the sake of your teeth.

In a way, it's a bit of a love-hate relationship between this frozen wonderfulness and your dental health. Like any dairy, ice cream is full of nutrients like calcium, phosphorous and vitamin D that together strengthen tooth enamel and help prevent decay. But this nutritional benefit is tempered in most ice cream by its other major ingredient: sugar.

Sugar can be a problem for your teeth because disease-causing oral bacteria love it just as much as you do. It's a prime food source for them, and when there's a lot available (like right after you finish that dipped cone) bacteria go crazy multiplying and producing acid. This could lead to tooth decay or gum disease.

Sugar's effect on dental health is an issue not only with ice cream but with other desserts and sweetened snacks as well. What can you do, then, to have your ice cream (or cake) and your dental health too?

Moderate your consumption. We're not saying you have to give up sweet desserts like ice cream—just keep your portions small and infrequent. Partake of them mainly as an occasional treat rather than as standard everyday fare.

Brush after eating. The biggest threat to dental health is the sugar that lingers in the mouth after we eat something sweet like ice cream. So, wash your mouth out with water and then brush your teeth after eating to remove any residual sugar. But not right away—give your saliva a chance to neutralize any mouth acid first by waiting about thirty minutes.

Choose healthier options. Instead of diving into a bowl of butter pecan or rocky road when you get the urge to snack, try a little non-fat Greek yogurt or cheese with some fresh fruit. Choosing alternatives like these can still give you the benefit of dairy without the excess sugar.

Ice cream is one of those indulgent little pleasures that make life sweet. Just be sure you're enjoying it within healthy limits to protect your dental health.

If you would like more information about nutrition and dental health, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Nutrition & Oral Health” and “The Bitter Truth About Sugar.”

By Your Family Dentist, PC
July 20, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Dentures  

Having weak or missing teeth can affect your regular oral functions significantly. Normal activities like eating, talking, and even smiling would be tough to do. If you want to restore your oral functions, dentures could be a practical solution. These are wearable dental appliances that are commonly used for replacing lost teeth.

Here at Your Family Dentist, PC in Glendale, AZ and serving the Glendale and Phoenix, AZ area, you can talk to your dentist, Dr. Yati Yadav, to find out how dentures can help you.

What Types of Dentures Are Available?
Based on the condition of your teeth, your dentist will determine what type of denture you may require—possibly one of the following:

  • Complete/Full dentures - These types of dentures are often recommended for individuals who have lost an entire set of teeth. The replacement teeth can be made from acrylic or porcelain and are supported by an acrylic foundation that matches the color of your gums. Before fitting complete dentures, your dentist will first have to pull out any remaining teeth in your mouth.

These dentures can be either conventional or immediate. A conventional denture can be placed in your mouth after your gums start to heal in around eight to 12 weeks. On the other hand, immediate dentures are made right after your teeth have been removed. However, plenty of adjustments will likewise have to be made throughout the healing period.

  • Partial Dentures: When you are missing only a few teeth, partial dentures can help fix the gap. These can be adhered to natural teeth using several methods, the most common being the utilization of metal clasps that can stick to your natural teeth. A different choice your dentist may offer is a partial denture that is bonded with clear and precise attachments that are less visible.

How Are Dentures Fabricated?
Fabrication could take a few weeks and several visits. When your dentist in Glendale, AZ, determines what type of denture is most appropriate for you, the general procedure will involve the following steps:

  • A series of impressions will be created from your jaw. Your dentist will take measurements of how your jaws connect and the amount of space between them.
  • Wax forms, models, and plastic patterns in the precise shape and position of your denture will be made. The model will need to be worn several times as the denture will be evaluated for shape, color, and fit.
  • The completed denture is cast.
  • The appropriate adjustments will be made by your dentist.

What Benefits Can Dentures Offer Me?
Dentures can provide you with various advantages such as the following:

  • Enhanced smile and overall appearance
  • A boost in self-esteem and confidence
  • Improvement in your speech
  • Long-lasting teeth restorations
  • Easy maintenance of your oral health

To Learn How Dentures Can Help Your Specific Concerns, Contact Us
Arrange an evaluation with your dentist, Dr. Yati Yadav of Your Family Dentist, PC here in Glendale, AZ and serving the Glendale and Phoenix, AZ area, by dialing (623) 878-3300.

By Your Family Dentist, PC
July 13, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: snoring   sleep apnea  
ThisOralApplianceCouldHelpSolveYourSleepApneaProblem

Millions of people have obstructive sleep apnea—and some don’t even realize it. That’s because even though these airway-blocking episodes can occur several times a night, they may only last a few seconds. The brain rouses the body just long enough to open the airway but not long enough to awaken the person to consciousness.

Even though a person with sleep apnea might not remember what happened to them, they can still experience the effects of sleep disturbance: drowsiness, irritability or an inability to focus. Over time, the accumulation of “bad sleep” could increase their risk for heart disease or other life-threatening conditions.

But there are effective ways to alleviate or lessen obstructive sleep apnea. The main “go-to” treatment is a method called continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). CPAP utilizes an electric pump that supplies a constant flow of pressurized air through a mask worn by the patient while sleeping. The increased air pressure around the throat helps keep the airway open.

But although it’s effective, CPAP is unpopular with many people who have tried it. Many find the hose and other equipment cumbersome, or the mask too uncomfortable or restrictive to wear. As a result, quite a number simply avoid using it.

If you’ve had a similar experience with CPAP or would rather explore other options, we may have an alternative: an oral appliance you wear while you sleep. It can help prevent or lessen symptoms in cases of mild to moderate airway obstruction caused by the tongue or other forms of tissue.

Sleep apnea appliances come in two basic forms. One uses metal hinges to help move the lower jaw and tongue forward. The other form has a compartment that fits around the tongue and applies suction to help keep the tongue moved forward.

These appliances may not be suitable for patients with severe sleep apnea or whose cause is something other than a physical obstruction like abnormal neurological signaling patterns. But where they are appropriate, they can be an effective alternative to CPAP and the key to a better night’s sleep.

If you would like more information on this dental solution for sleep apnea, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Appliances for Sleep Apnea.”





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